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ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

ca-tsuka:

Mondo is celabrating LAIKA Animation Studios with releases of CORALINE & PARANORMAN soundtracks on deluxe limited edition vinyl.

psuedofolio:

Zero Point Five Suit

psuedofolio:

Zero Point Five Suit

bizarrejelly5:

today in art history my professor compared these two dürer pieces and asked “what do you think dürer learned in the time between making these” and all i could think was

"he learned how to draw lions"

super-paperconan-2:

Missing last night’s lunar eclipse.

super-paperconan-2:

Missing last night’s lunar eclipse.

kanasaiii:

Kill la Kill キルラキル

Satsuki Kiryuin 鬼龍院 皐月 by Kanasaiii

Photos by Nik Yan & Cvy

Bakuzan, Gako & Glove made by Kanasaiii
Costume by Ashteyz Liew
Shoot Assist by Wong Yokey Heng, Data Ronin

meticulist:

onward noble steed

meticulist:

onward noble steed

jakewyattriot:

Test Number Two.  Stay tuned.  Next week she uses the sword.

For those of you who missed it: Test Number One.

-Jake

laboratoryequipment:

Sharks Aren’t Living FossilsThe skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates — including humans — than do modern sharks, as was previously thought. The new study, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, shows that living sharks are actually quite advanced in evolutionary terms, despite having retained their basic “sharkiness” over millions of years. The research is published today in the journal Nature.“Sharks are traditionally thought to be one of the most primitive surviving jawed vertebrates. And most textbooks in schools today say that the internal jaw structures of modern sharks should look very similar to those in primitive shark-like fishes,” says Alan Pradel, a postdoctoral researcher at the Museum and the lead author of the study. “But we’ve found that’s not the case. The modern shark condition is very specialized, very derived and not primitive.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/sharks-arent-living-fossils

laboratoryequipment:

Sharks Aren’t Living Fossils

The skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates — including humans — than do modern sharks, as was previously thought. The new study, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, shows that living sharks are actually quite advanced in evolutionary terms, despite having retained their basic “sharkiness” over millions of years. The research is published today in the journal Nature.

“Sharks are traditionally thought to be one of the most primitive surviving jawed vertebrates. And most textbooks in schools today say that the internal jaw structures of modern sharks should look very similar to those in primitive shark-like fishes,” says Alan Pradel, a postdoctoral researcher at the Museum and the lead author of the study. “But we’ve found that’s not the case. The modern shark condition is very specialized, very derived and not primitive.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/sharks-arent-living-fossils